Deprivation and Inequality

Deprivation and Inequality

 

Numerically, Fitzrovia exhibits low levels of deprivation and limited numbers of long term residents from ethnic minority communities with specialist needs. Overall indicators around wellbeing, employment and quality of living are high, and specialist training, support or advice services found in centres located in deprived areas are unlikely to form a key element of Fitzrovia Centre work in the future.

Equally, the model of community provision prevalent as recently as 2008, where centres such as Fitzrovia Centre might offer a range of free and subsidised services through grant funding, is neither practicable nor necessary in an area of conspicuous personal and commercial wealth which might be tapped into. However, the lack of a sizeable population facing deprivation does not prevent Fitzrovia Centre from engaging in such activities as an element of its work, or hinder an understanding that the low number of individuals with specialist needs may be particularly harshly impacted when residing in an area of comparative wealth and little community sector support provision.

Fitzrovia Centre might therefore provide a valuable strand of work, supported by sponsorship, donation, volunteer delivery or other forms of cross-subsidy, to engage with these targeted groups and offer opportunities for them to engage both in targeted work and in the wider centre programme. By engaging with existing statutory and VCS partners, Fitzrovia Centre could also fruitfully develop emerging work to host specialist funded services, thus offering a local venue for delivery while also increasing rates of centre hire and further improving relations with both Westminster and Camden local authorities.